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Two mothers take custody battle to U.S. Supreme Court

Child custody is something parents should take seriously. When a marriage or a relationship comes to an end, and there are children involved, one or both parents may wish to gain sole custody of the children. With both parents wanting certain things to happen, they often end up disputing until they eventually can agree or a judge makes the decision for them.

When one parent refuses to follow the rules of custody

Anyone who has ever watched a television drama knows that custody battles can get ugly. Unfortunately, reaching a custody agreement is frequently just the beginning of the fight. As children get older and lives change, parents can potentially find themselves embroiled in custody battles again and again.

Steps to take after abducted child is returned from other parent

Child custody disputes are never easy to deal with. On top of having to deal with the emotions of just getting divorced or ending their relationship, they will have to deal with the emotions they will feel about losing their child or not seeing him or her as much. Any parent would agree that this is difficult, but that doesn't mean a child custody dispute can't be handled in a mature manner. Ideally, that is what will be done because there is a child involved, but parents don't always behave this way and do what is best for the child.

What should parents consider when requesting sole custody?

There are many different types of family situations that parents and their children can find themselves in. In the past, divorce may have not been a popular decision, but nowadays, when couples feel that the marriage is over, they divorce, whether or not they have children together. With this being the case, when two people decide to end their marriage or relationship, they will be left to handle the issue of child custody. This can often lead to a disagreement, especially if one parent decides to request sole custody.

Which parent is considered the primary caretaker?

Child custody is a touchy issue for parents to discuss. No matter how amicable things may have ended between both parents, when they decided to no longer be together, there is still the chance that one or both parents will become angry or upset at the possibility of the other parent being awarded sole custody. Even though both parents may be worried about the other getting sole custody of their child, the parent who is the primary caretaker may have less to worry about.

What is a parenting agreement and how can I get it approved?

When parents have to discuss child custody and attempt to work together to find an arrangement that works for all parties involved, they may be reluctant to do so at first. For some, the relationship has ended and seeing the other parent of their child is not something they look forward to even if it is for something important. Despite how they feel, their child needs both parents in his or her life, so both parents will have to face each other to figure out a solution, whether that is with their attorneys or in front of a judge.

Why should parents consider joint custody?

Should two people decide to no longer be together, and they have children, they will have to discuss child custody. Some parents may be able to sit down and figure out an arrangement that they both can agree on. Others may find it difficult because they let their emotions get in the way. When discussing child custody, parents will have a number of options to choose from, but not every alternative is as rewarding to the parents and the child as joint custody.

Does child custody differ for married and unmarried couples?

Child custody disputes are not easy for any parent to handle. With them often being concerned about losing their child or getting less time with them, they may be emotional throughout the entire process. Even though child custody is an issue that is addressed differently for unmarried and married couples, the emotional reaction parents may experience is similar.

Consider the effect moving away will have on your child

Being awarded custody of your child is a good thing, but it is a lot of responsibility to take on by yourself. As a parent of a child, you are responsible for making smart decisions that will not affect your child negatively in the present or the future. These smart choices include deciding where your child will live.

Issues with interstate child custody

Two parents who are no longer in a relationship may experience many issues when it comes to child custody. Ideally, it would be nice if both parents could agree on how the child will be raised and who he or she will live with, but there are some instances where they dispute instead. Oftentimes, these disputes over child custody will land the parents in court where a judge will make the decision for them, which is something not all parents enjoy.